theology

young earth or old earth: special creation continuing?

young earth or old earth?
young earth or old earth: do answers exist?
young earth or old earth: answers do exist
young earth or old earth revealed
young earth or old earth revealed, part two
young earth or old earth: the testimony of theology
young earth or old earth: the testimony of theology, part two
young earth or old earth: theistic evolution
young earth or old earth: the gap theory
young earth or old earth: the gap theory, part two
young earth or old earth: day age theory
young earth or old earth: underlying assumptions
young earth or old earth: underlying assumptions, part two
young earth or old earth: underlying assumptions, part three

We left off with: “So I claim the day age theory does violence to theology, therefore the science upon which it relies — the old age of the earth — is suspect; day agers claim an old earth does no violence to theology. That is what we will examine next.”

The best place to begin would be with the Reasons to Believe (Dr. Hugh Ross, the major Christian and creationist non-evolutionist old earth proponent) website, which has posted Eight Myths about Reasons to Believe. In rebutting what Reasons to Believe considers the most misleading assumptions about its beliefs, they provide a helpful clarification of what they do actually believe, scientifically and theologically.

Myth one: that Reasons to Believe teaches theistic evolution: “RTB believes that God has miraculously intervened throughout the history of the universe in various ways millions, possibly even billions, of times to create each and every new species of life on Earth.”

Gen 2:1-3 says:

“Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. And on the seventh day God ended His work which he had made; and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had made. And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it He had rested from all His work which God created and made.”

Here Scripture teaches that God’s work of creation was finished, and ended, on the seventh day; which, we are told, is the reason the seventh day was hallowed as a day of rest. The finality of the work of creation was further reinforced by God when He included the observance of the Sabbath as a rest day within the Ten Commandments. Moses writes this was to remind us that on the seventh day God’s work of creation was completed. Moreover, the writer of Hebrews reinforces the theology of the sabbath rest as a type of the rest believers enjoy in Christ, and links it to the historical cessation of the work of creation:

For we who have believed enter that rest, as He has said, “As I swore in My wrath, ‘They shall not enter My rest,’” although His works were finished from the foundation of the world. For He has somewhere spoken of the seventh day in this way: “And God rested on the seventh day from all His works.” Heb 4:3-4

In all these instances, the work of creation is proclaimed by Scripture to have been completed.

Continued in young earth or old earth: special creation is finished

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