theology

young earth or old earth: underlying assumptions, part two

young earth or old earth?
young earth or old earth: do answers exist?
young earth or old earth: answers do exist
young earth or old earth revealed
young earth or old earth revealed, part two
young earth or old earth: the testimony of theology
young earth or old earth: the testimony of theology, part two
young earth or old earth: theistic evolution
young earth or old earth: the gap theory
young earth or old earth: the gap theory, part two
young earth or old earth: day age theory
young earth or old earth: underlying assumptions

We were talking about the assumptions behind the reasoning of the day age theory: that Scripture is consistent with an old age of the earth; for, science has proved age beyond doubt, therefore theology must be made to support science, in order to remain viable as truth. We discussed the first two assumptions behind that reasoning.

3. The third assumption is that every axiom which is currently held in science (such as the old age of the earth), is absolute and will remain an axiom in future generations. In fact, science is the truth discipline which has experienced the greatest change in its axioms throughout its history. If a snapshot of the axioms held by science as authoritative were taken in 100 year intervals, from the rise of Grecian supremacy until today; you would find them at great variance and even contradiction. In fact, there is one axiom about science that is almost absolute, and that is that the axioms of science are always changing. This is not because nature is itself unstable, necessarily, but it is because our knowledge of nature is– that is, imperfect and incomplete.

Science, alone, without the other truth disciplines to anchor it, can truly be said to be always learning and never able to arrive at a knowledge of the truth.

In light of the changeable history of science’s axioms, it is much more logical to suppose that new evidence will bring today’s ‘proved beyond doubt’ statements into question at some point in the future, than it is to suppose that today’s statements will remain settled through future generations.

Continued in young earth or old earth: underlying assumptions, part three

One thought on “young earth or old earth: underlying assumptions, part two

  1. I really look forward to reading your thoughts on the YE/OE. I just blogged about some of the resources we use in our homeschool from Master Books.

    I noticed you were reading the Annals of the World. Would you mind at some point giving your thoughts on this book (or directing me to where it is on your blog if you aleady have?) I am considering this book for the future and am not really sure what kind of reading it is, etc. I had Katherine Dang’s, Universal History at one point, but it was very dry reading. Not that I am looking for a thrill ride, but in the same manner your books are interesting and engaging–history should be enjoyed and not endured. :+)

    Warmly,
    Kate

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