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Cross and crown of thorns, the symbols of our Lord’s suffering for our sakes




Classical Christian
Homeschooling:
Classical Education
at Home

WebMaster:
Christine Miller

What’s New at
Classical Christian
Homeschooling

This page last revised:
January 2003

Copyright 1997-2003

2001 Additions


September


August

The first essay in the Basic Minimum Christianism collection is titled, “Uncomfortable Words.” And they are. In these essays, Richard Mitchell calls into question everyone who claims to educate without teaching clear language and the power of reason -- the first two tools, grammar and logic, in the three tools of learning. He spares not private Christian schools, nor even popular Christian organizations seeking to influence public policy, such as the Eagle Forum or the Moral Majority. He is an equal opportunity blaster of Protestant and Catholic educationism. But keep reading. If criticism is leveled at the Church, can it be because the Church has earned it? It is the Church that abandoned the intellect, reason, and academia after “our” position was destroyed at the Scopes Trial in 1925 by Clarence Darrow and the ACLU. We decided that faith and reason cannot go together, a strange conclusion that Mitchell claims even Martin Luther shared. We abandoned the head and focused on the heart, and forgot that Jesus commanded, “Love the Lord thy God with all thy heart AND mind and soul and strength.” It is not either heart or head, either faith or reason. It is heart AND head, faith AND reason. Those who teach faith to the exclusion of reason do as much harm as those who teach reason to the exclusion of faith. We need both.

For another perspective on this whole debate, my husband and I have been listening to many of Dr. Davis’ messages (see Family Alternatives in Past Why We Homeschool Site of the Month links). In either the message Changing the Heart of a Rebel, or The Secret to Becoming Strong, Dr. Davis mentioned he would rather a person was a God-fearing ignoramus than an educated fool. If someone fears God, which I believe means, he acknowledges not only God’s existence, but also His sovreignty by reason of His existence, and has submitted his life to Him accordingly, seeking to serve and worship Him in the manner God has prescribed, i.e., through faith in Jesus Christ our Lord, then that person has begun to be wise: “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom,” (Proverbs 9:10). The God-fearing ignoramus won’t stay that way long, because “the ear of the wise seeks knowledge,” (Proverbs 18:15). But “the fool says in his heart, ‘There is no God,’” (Psalms 14:1). An evolutionist scientist is an educated fool; an abortion doctor is an educated fool. I agree with Dr. Davis; if you can only teach one, teach the heart to be wise. But we do not have to only teach one. We can teach the heart to be wise, and the mind to reason. Faith and reason do not contradict each other at all, but truth, which God personifies, is established by proper inquiry and investigation. The excess of the Renaissance, which undoubtedly Martin Luther was preaching against, was elevating human reason to a place above God Himself. Faith teaches us the limits of human reason, that there is thought higher than humans can reason or understand (Isaiah 55:8-9).

We homeschool to avoid the mistakes of educationism, false education, in both government and private schools, in neglecting the teaching of reason to indoctrinate in humanism or Christianism, rather than teaching truth, “difficult disciplines”, and “difficult doctrine”, if we will listen.


July


June


May

Where have we been? About six or so weeks ago, our computers were hit with a virus -- the first we’ve ever had. It has been a trial to get it cleaned out of everything, and all our data and programs restored. But we are almost there. Just this week I have been able to access the website again. The final thing that is still not working is our e-mail, but we continue to work on it, and hope to have it up and running in the next few days or a week. :-)


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